Transplants:

A healthy transplanted kidney lasts on
average only 10 years, around one
third of the time it should last. Organs
such as hearts and livers fail even
sooner. The consequence is that
patients who have had one donor
organ often need another.



STEM CELLS LET KIDNEY
TRANSPALNT PATIENTS SKIP
REJECTION DRUGS
In a small study, announced in March
2012, kidney transplant patients given
a mixture of stem cells from their organ
donor were able to quit taking anti-
rejection medicine, suggesting that life-
long reliance on the toxic drugs may
be avoidable.

Five of eight patients treated were able
to stop taking about a dozen pills a day
to suppress their immune systems.
The drugs, which prevent rejection and
stop tissue from a donated kidney from
attacking the patient, can damage the
transplant and cause diabetes,
infections, heart disease and cancer.

In the breakthrough they   mixed stem
cells from the donor’s infection-fighting
immune system with the patient’s
natural immune system. The result
enabled tissue from both to co-exist in
the transplant patient without either
being seen as “foreign” by the immune
system, researchers said.

The results “may potentially have an
enormous, paradigm- shifting impact
on solid-organ transplantation.

The findings are particularly striking
since the patients weren’t perfect
tissue matches with the living donors.
The mismatch traditionally makes it
more difficult for the donated organ to
survive since the patient’s immune
system perceives the unfamiliar tissue
as a threat.

The findings are particularly striking
since the patients weren’t perfect
tissue matches with the living donors.
The mismatch traditionally makes it
more difficult for the donated organ to
survive since the patient’s immune
system perceives the unfamiliar tissue
as a threat.

Two of the study’s 10 authors are
officers in Regenerex LLC, a startup
biotechnology company based in
Louisville, Kentucky, that is involved in
processing the donor cells.  Suzanne
Ildstad, director of the Institute of
Cellular Therapeutics at the University
of Louisville in Kentucky  has an equity
interest in the company and is an
author on a patent for the facilitator
cells, which she discovered.




ORGAN TRANSPLANTS INNOVATION:
STEM CELL INFUSION MAY
COMPENSATE FOR REJECTION
Patients who are lucky enough to get a
transplant for a failed organ usually
face a lifetime on anti-rejection drugs,
which are expensive, dangerous and
not always effective.

But in the future, those drugs may not
be needed. A small new study
suggests that patients receiving an
organ that is  less than a perfect match
can be protected against rejection by a
second transplant — this time of the
organ donor's stem cells.


In March 2012 a  small pilot study,
reported  in the journal Science
Translational Medicine, describes a
novel regimen that combined old-
fashioned cancer treatments with 21st
century cell therapy to induce five
patients' immune systems to accept
donor kidneys as their own despite
significant incompatibility.

If the technique proves successful in a
larger group of people, future
transplant patients may need to take
anti-rejection drugs only briefly.The
recipients of kidneys as well as other
organs, including heart, lung, liver and
pancreas, might also benefit from
access to a wider pool of organs.

The strategy could offer hope, too, for
patients receiving bone marrow
transplants to treat blood cancers,
speeding the process of finding a
donor by allowing physicians to use
stem cells that today would be rejected
as incompatible.





FIRST US PATIENT GETS STEM CELL
TRACHEA TRANSPLANT IN EUROPE
In June 2011 Christopher Lyles, 30, of
Abingdon, Md, exhausted the limited
treatment options available in the U.S.
for his tracheal cancer. But Lyles read
about an experimental tracheal
transplant procedure surgeons
performed in Europe using adult stem
cells.

Lyles reached out to Dr. Paolo
Macchiarini, director of the Advanced
Center for Translational Regenerative
Medicine at the Karolinska Institute in
Stockholm, who was the head surgeon
in previous transplant cases.

After a 12 hour procedure in Sweden,
Lyles was breathing through a lab
grown windpipe that doctors fashioned
from his own stem cells.

Doctors regenerated tissue from Lyles'
bone marrow stem cells to create a
trachea biologically identical to Lyles'
original organ. Lyle underwent the
transplant in November 2011.

Within three months, Lyles was able to
eat and speak on his own.

Once the trachea is damaged, it is
difficult to get it to heal correctly.

Trachea cancer is resistant to
chemotherapy and radiation and
attempts to replace the trachea with
mechanical devices have not been
effective.

Lyles first underwent seven rounds of
chemotherapy and 33 rounds of
radiation treatment between July and
September.

Using a patient's own stem cells not
only could help to rebuild the fragile
tissue, but also potentially could
bypass the risk of having the organ
rejected.





FIRST EVER DOUBLE LEG
TRANSPLANT IN SPAIN
Recently there have been several
face, hand and abdominal wall
transplants.

A young man in Spain  received two
limbs during the first-ever double leg
transplant.

Dr. Pedro Cavadas, a transplant
surgeon at La Fe Hospital in Valencia,
Spain who led the surgical team, said
during a press conference the patient
was very excited after he saw his new
legs.

But doctors stress that while the
patient is doing well so far, it's difficult
to say for sure how he will progress.

Surgeons performed the complex 10-
hour operation in July 2011 on a
young man in his 20s who lost both
legs in an accident.

Cavadas is the same surgeon who
performed Spain's first double arm
transplant in 2008 as well as the
country's first face transplant in 2009.

A transplant surgeon not involved in
this case  believes the young man will
someday walk again, but says in
addition to enduring the intensive
physical rehabilitation learning to walk
will take, he will have to overcome a
number of other challenges as well.

He has to recover from a major
operation and the fact that he's a
transplant patient, he'll probably need
lifelong immunosuppressive
medications to prevent his body's
immune system from destroying the
transplanted limbs.  And even after
everything is healed, it will be a lot of
time before the neuromuscular
anatomy is integrated into his brain so
he can walk.


CANCER PATIENT SAVED WITH LAB-
MADE WINDPIPE
Doctors have replaced the cancer-
stricken windpipe of a patient with an
organ made in a lab, a landmark
achievement for regenerative
medicine. The patient no longer has
cancer and is expected to have a
normal life expectancy, doctors said.

"He was condemned to die," said Paolo
Macchiarini, a professor of
regenerative surgery who carried out
the procedure at Sweden's Karolinska
University Hospital.

The patient's speedy recovery marks
another milestone in the quest to make
fresh body parts for transplantation or
to treat disease. More immediately, it
offers a possible treatment option for
thousands of patients who suffer from
tracheal cancer or other dangerous
conditions affecting the windpipe.

In March last year a 10-year-old British
boy received a windpipe that had been
impregnated with his own stem cells,
which meant he did not have to take
powerful immuno-suppressant drugs.
However, it used a trachea, or
windpipe, originally taken from a 30-
year-old woman.

This new technique does not need a
donor: it was created from scratch with
the help of technology from University
College London.

Scientists there were given three-
dimensional CT scans of the windpipe
of the patient Andemariam
Teklesenbet Beyene, a geology
student from Eritrea.

From the scans, Prof Alex Seifalian
and colleagues created a glass mould
of Mr Beyene's windpipe and his two
main bronchial tubes.

The Y-shaped structure was then
coated in a special polymer containing
millions of tiny holes.

This was placed in a bioreactor for two
days to allow the stem cells to take
root. Cells to line the replacement
windpipe were also used, taken from
the patient's nose.
The bioreactor was made by
researchers at Harvard Bioscience Inc.
of Holliston, Mass., a shoe-box-size
device similar to a spinning rotisserie
machine. The artificial scaffold was
placed on the bioreactor; then, stem
cells extracted from the patient's bone
marrow were dripped onto the
revolving scaffold for two days.

It took Prof Macchiarini 12 hours to
perform the operation, first removing
the tumour and the diseased windpipe
and then installing the replacement.

He has previously undertaken 10
windpipe operations, including the first
of a tissue-engineered trachea, on a
30-year-old Spanish woman called
Claudia Costillo in 2008.

However, this is the first not to require
a donor organ.





BELATACEPT  APPROVED  FOR
PREVENTING GRAFT REJECTION
The FDA has approved belatacept
(Nulojix) for use with other
immunosuppressants in preventing
organ rejection in kidney transplant
patients.

The drug -- a selective T-cell
costimulation blocker -- is given in 30-
minute intravenous infusions.

Drug approval was based on two
phase III clinical trials of 1,200 patients
comparing belatacept against
cyclosporine.

Belatacept was approved with a boxed
warning for an increased risk of post-
transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

A second boxed warning -- common to
all immunosuppressants -- cautions of
an increased risk of serious infection
and other cancers.

Adverse events during the trials
included anemia, constipation, kidney
or bladder infection, and swollen legs,
ankles, and feet.

Belatacept was developed by Bristol-
Myers Squibb to prevent graft rejection
and maintain kidney function following
kidney transplant.

Belatacept is a fusion protein designed
to bind to a specific site on certain
cells of the immune system (i.e.,
antigen presenting cells) to block the
second signal necessary to activate  T-
cells, which coordinate immune-
mediated rejection of transplanted
organs.


ORGANS TO BE FIXED BEFORE
TRANSPLANTATION
In a study published in April 2011 in
the New England Journal of Medicine,
researchers said the number of donor
lungs and successful transplants may
be dramatically increased by treating
the organs on a perfusion machine for
several hours before transplantation.

In the new procedure, lungs are placed
in a protective glass dome after being
removed from the donor. They're then
hooked up to a ventilator, so the lungs
can continue to breathe, and the lungs
are given what's known as a perfusion
solution to mimic blood circulating
through them.

"We've developed a technique that
allows us to assess and treat lungs
outside of the body," said the study's
senior author, Dr. Shaf Keshavjee,
director of the Toronto Lung
Transplant Program at Toronto
General Hospital.

The technique marks a paradigm shift
in the transplantation field, experts
noted. About 85% of lungs made
available for donation are not used
due to tissue damage that potentially
could be repaired with perfusion or
other techniques.

Variations on the pre-transplant
treatment concept are also being tried
on kidneys, livers and hearts. Lungs,
however, provide a unique opportunity
because they are greatly needed and
appear so amenable to perfusion
treatment.

In the United States, 1,786 people are
on the waiting list for a lung transplant,
according to the Department of Health
and Human Services' Organ
Procurement and Transplantation
Network. About one-third of these
patients wait at least three years for a
suitable pair of donor lungs, and about
10% to 15% of people die before
receiving a transplant.

The study was sponsored by Vitrolife,
a biotechnology company that supplied
materials and equipment for the
research


MIROCOCEPT COULD DOUBLE LIFE
OF TRANSPLANT ORGANS
At the moment, fewer than 50% of
grafts are still working after a decade
inside the patient.

The new approach involves washing
the organ in an engineered drug
solution during the transfer from the
donor to the recipient.

The British Science Festival was told
that the solution gives protection to the
organ from the immune system.
A new treatment, developed by
researchers at King's College London,
UK,  is based on the defense
mechanism healthy organs use to
shield themselves from the immune
system.

Protein molecules that dot the surface
of organs keep the immune system in
check and prevent it from launching an
attack. These proteins are lost when
organs are removed from the body,
handled and stored on ice.

The King's team found a way to
manufacture these proteins in the
laboratory and produced a drug called
mirococept, which can be fed into the
organ with a drip.

Studies suggest the procedure could
extend the life of an implanted kidney
by around seven years. "If the
treatment goes to plan, it can be
expected to almost double the life of a
graft," said Steven Sacks, director of
the MRC Centre for Transplantation.

The scientists believe the treatment will
also extend the shelf-life of donor
organs, increasing the time they
survive outside the body from no more
than 24 hours to several days. This
could reduce wastage and double the
number of organs that work properly
once they are transplanted, doctors
said. In early tests, only a fifth of
organs worked properly after being
stored on ice for 16 hours, compared
with 50% of those treated with
mirococept.

A recent pilot study of the treatment on
16 patients found it was safe to use.
The group now plan to recruit more
than 300 patients for a trial that will
take place at transplant centres across
the country.


BEATING HEART TRANSPLANTS
WITH  TRANSMEDICS ORGAN BOX
The world's first beating heart
transplant was performed in Germany
in 2006, using an organ box invented
by TransMedics Inc., a private medical
device company in Andover, Mass., as
part of a multi-center study in Europe.

A "beating heart" transplant is an
experimental operation that's mostly
been done in Europe. The donor heart
is placed into a special box that feeds
it blood and keeps it warm and ticking
outside the body.

Currently there is a great deal of rush:
the harvesting , delivering and
transplanting  must be done within   4
to 6 hours before the organ starts to
deteriorate.
Research has shown that the longer it
takes to remove a heart and transplant
it, the greater the patient's chance of
death or heart disease.

But what if a heart could beat on its
own after removal from a cadaver?

The new high-tech heart box circulates
blood from the donor to the heart so
that it continues throbbing while in
transit from hospital to hospital.

Transmedics  is currently funding a
UCLA-led experiment, which will enroll
128 patients nationwide, randomly
chosen to get a beating heart
transplant or the traditional kind.

About 100 patients, mostly in Europe,
have had a beating heart transplant,
according to TransMedics.

Early signs from two European
experiments involving 54 patients are
encouraging. There has been 97%
survival a month after the operation
and few episodes of rejection and
heart-related complications. But since
there were no comparison groups in
either study, it's impossible to know
whether a beating heart transplant is
actually better.

The current U.S. study is the first to
test the methods head-to-head.



WINDPIPE TRANSPLANTS USING
STEM CELLS
Ciaran Finn-Lynch, 11, underwent the
pioneering trachea transplant in March
and is set to return home to Northern
Ireland after the surgery was declared
a success.

Doctors at Great Ormond Street
Hospital in London took stem cells from
the youngster's bone marrow and
injected them into a donor windpipe
which had been stripped of its own
cells.
They implanted the organ and allowed
the stem cells to transform themselves
in his own body. By using his cells,
doctors could avoid the potential
problem of Ciaran's immune system
rejecting the organ.


FURTHER WINDPIPE TRANSPLANTS
USING STEM CELLS
Medics created a windpipe transplant
with a British teenager's own stem
cells. This meant the teenager won't
need to take anti-rejection drugs

Doctors have carried out pioneering
lifesaving surgery to give a new
windpipe to a British teenager suffering
from cancer.
The 19-year-old was able to speak
within a few days of the operation
carried out in Italy using her own stem
cells.
Another 31-year-old patient from
Czechoslovakia also underwent
surgery for the same rare form of
trachea cancer.

Dr Walter Giovannini, from AOU
Careggi Hospital, in Florence, Italy,  
"This is a unique solution for a problem
that had none, except the death of the
patient."

'While trachea cancer is rare, it is very
difficult to treat because it is resistant
to chemotherapy and radiation and
transplants of mechanical devices to
replace the windpipe have not been
effective.'
The surgical team was headed by
Professor Paolo Macchiarini who
participated in a windpipe transplant in
Spain nearly two years ago.

A similar procedure was followed in this
case. The donor windpipe was stripped
of all cells until it was just a tube with
no organic material. Just before being
transplanted, Dr. Macchiarini injected
the donor trachea with the stem cells.
In the Spanish case, the stem cells
were grown on the trachea before the
transplant.

It takes two to three months for the
stem cells to completely cover the
trachea, creating a new organ.

In the meantime, the windpipe is
functional without the cells - acting as
a sort of mechanical device before the
stem cells transform it into an organ.

Dr Giovannini said using the new
approach means it takes two to three
months for the stem cells to completely
cover the trachea, creating a new
organ.
'In the meantime, the windpipe is
functional without the cells - acting as
a sort of mechanical device before the
stem cells transform it into an organ.'

The 31-year-old Czech and 19-year-
old British patients are in good
condition and have been released
from the hospital in Florence just
weeks after the surgery.

Macchiarini told a press conference in
Florence the procedure could in the
future be applied to other organs.

"I'm thinking about the larynx or
surgeries involving lungs," Macchiarini
said.



OVARY TRANSPLANT
A mother has become the first in the
world to give birth to a second child
after an ovary transplant operation,
doctors in Denmark have revealed.
Baby Lucca and sister Aviaja are
among just nine children born through
the procedure, where ovarian tissue is
removed, frozen and transplanted.
Their mother was robbed of her fertility
by cancer treatment.
Experts say the technique could help
others facing treatment that might
damage their ovaries.
The ovarian tissue is cyopreserved. It
appears to be a valid method of fertility
preservation for girls and young
women facing treatment that could
damage their ovaries.
This is how it works:
The ovary is removed via keyhole
surgery which reduces recovery time.
The ovary is then frozen until further
notice.
The ovary to be transplanted is thawed
out slowly beforehand. The transplant
procedure is performed as open
surgery this time and involves
reconnecting tiny blood vessels to the
ovary. This enables a steady blood
flow to the ovary which is vital for it to
function.
It will take a few months following
surgery for the ovary to be fully
functional but evidence suggests that
normal hormone production occurs
within 5 months or so.
Another option is to transplant sections
of ovarian tissue rather than the
complete ovary. Some women have
undergone surgery in which strips of
ovarian tissue have been transplanted
onto their defective ovary which then
enables it work again. And this has
resulted in successful pregnancies.
This procedure is still in its infancy but
holds out a great deal of promise for
female infertility in the future.



LIFEPORT KIDNEY TRANSPORTER
by Organ Recovery Systems:
LifePort provides a sealed, sterile,
protected transportation box where a
solution is gently pumped through the
kidney at cold temperatures to
minimize damage while the organ is
outside the body. LifePort is lightweight
and portable, allowing organs to be
perfused from the time of recovery
until transplant. It is designed to travel
unaccompanied by land or air, safely
transporting the kidneys across town
or between countries. While the kidney
is being perfused, the LifePort records
data on temperature, flow rate
vascular resistance and pressure
every 10 seconds providing surgeons
with additional data prior to transplant.



OTHER DEVELOPMENTS
THE TALE OF TWO WINDPIPES
Two very different organ transplant
stories highlight the amazing skills of
surgeons, and the importance of stem
cells for the future of surgery.
Both transplants involved the trachea,
women, and operations in Europe.
In the first, Claudia Castillo had a
donor’s trachea covered in her own
stem cells so that it could be
transplanted into her chest as the left
bronchus. The second transplant gave
Linda de Croock a new trachea by first
letting the donor organ acclimate to
her body in her arm for ten months.
The stem cell treatment was performed
by doctors at the University of Bristol
(UK) and the Hospital Clinic of
Barcelona (Spain) in 2008. The
trachea-in-arm treatment was
performed at the University Hospital of
Leuven (Belgium) and was recently
discussed in the New England Journal
of Medicine. Comparing these two
operations demonstrates the
phenomenal capabilities of modern
medicine, and shows that stem cells
enhance those capabilities in
remarkable ways.
De Croock kept the trachea in her arm
for ten months, with layers of plaster
around the limb to keep it safe. She
also was kept on a steady regimen of
immunosuppressants to prevent
rejection. After four months, mucous
was growing healthily on the organ.
Nearer the ten month mark,
suppression therapy stopped and the
organ remained healthy. Eventually,
the chimeric trachea was transplanted
into the throat. Once there, no further
immunosuppression therapy was
needed.
Linda’s new trachea is doing well. She
can speak much more easily now, and
her breathing is normal. Because she
doesn’t require any further
suppression therapy, she is not as
vulnerable to illness, nor runs the
increased risk of cancer associated
with those medicines. Doctors were so
pleased with de Croock’s results that
they performed the same surgery on
an eighteen year old male and have
two more patients in queue.
Tuberculosis damaged Claudia Castillo’
s lungs and airways. The Colombian
mother had such trouble breathing that
she was often unable to play with her
children or climb stairs. Her left
bronchus was narrowing dangerously
and some sort of surgery was needed.
That’s where Professor Paolo
Macchiarini in Barcelona and
Professor Martin Birchall in Bristol
stepped in. Previous work with pigs
had shown that an organ could be
stripped down using enzymes and
other chemicals. This would leave the
organ as nothing but a scaffold. Stem
cells could be applied to this scaffold
and encouraged to regrow the organ.
Macchiarini and Birchall were willing to
try the procedure with Castillo and a
donor trachea. The trachea was
stripped down into a scaffold. Castillo’s
stem cells were harvested from her leg
bone marrow, and non-stem cells were
taken from her throat. Birchall used
these cells in a bioreactor in Bristol to
regrow the scaffold in Bristol. In just
four days, the organ was complete and
because Castillo’s cells were used in
the process, it would be recognized by
her body and not rejected. Macchiarini
then performed the operation to
replace her damaged left bronchus
with the new stem cell trachea.

Four days after that surgery, the team
found that the new organ was virtually
indistinguishable from the rest of
Castillo’s body. After a month, tests
proved that the transplanted trachea
had developed it’s own blood supply –
it was a viable part of her system. Four
months after her treatment, Castillo’s
ability to breathe showed great signs
of improvement: she could climb two
flights of stairs and take care of her
children.




ORGAN TRANSPLANT
INNOVATIONS

LUNG TO BE FIXED BEFORE
TRANSPLANTATION
For decades, heart and lung
transplant surgeons have followed a
strict directive: Get the donor organ
into the recipient as soon as possible.

That practice may be changing.
In a study published recently in the
New England Journal of Medicine,
researchers said the number of donor
lungs and successful transplants may
be dramatically increased by treating
the organs on a perfusion machine for
several hours before transplantation.

The technique marks a paradigm shift
in the transplantation field.

About 85% of lungs made available for
donation are not used due to tissue
damage that potentially could be
repaired with perfusion or other
techniques.

"We won't just transplant an organ,"
said Dr. Shaf Keshavjee, the senior
author of the study and director of the
Toronto Lung Transplant Program at
Toronto General Hospital. "We will
diagnose it, fix it, make it OK and then
transplant it."

Variations on the pre-transplant
treatment concept are also being tried
on kidneys, livers and hearts.
Lungs, however, provide a unique
opportunity because they are greatly
needed and appear so amenable to
perfusion treatment.


In the United States, 1,786 people are
on the waiting list for a lung transplant,
according to the Department of Health
and Human Services' Organ
Procurement and Transplantation
Network. About one-third of these
patients wait at least three years for a
suitable pair of donor lungs, and about
10% to 15% of people die before
receiving a transplant.

Lungs must be able to function
immediately once transplanted. For
that reason, surgeons are very
selective about which lungs they use
and accept only those in the most
pristine condition. That poses a
challenge because lungs are easily
damaged from injury or in the final
stages of terminal illness.

Many lungs are useable but since
doctors can't really assess them well
enough to be sure so they don't use
them.

The new technique pumps a liquid
consisting of oxygen, proteins and
nutrients into the donor lungs after
they've been removed and transported
to the recipient's hospital.
Keshavjee and his team used the
Toronto XVIVO Lung Perfusion
System, which was designed for this
purpose. The system is being used
around the world but is not yet
approved by the Food and Drug
Administration for use in the United
States.

Researchers treated 23 sets of lungs
that were impaired in some manner —
and would have been rejected for
transplant — with perfusion for four
hours and transplanted 20 of them that
looked viable after the treatment.
Surgery outcomes were compared with
116 patients who received
conventional donor lungs.

The perfusion technique essentially
repairs damage caused by swelling or
inflammation in the lung.
That opens the door to other types of
treatments for organs after they have
been removed from a donor's body,
including antibiotics, gene therapy or
even immunosuppressant medications
that might lower the risk of rejection.

Pre-transplant treatment of an organ
would add significant cost to transplant
surgeries. And, if the organ was
treated and still deemed unsuitable for
transplant, it's not clear who would pay
for the failed treatment.


OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

TRANSMEDICS "BEATING HEART"
ORGAN BOX
The heart transplantation team at
Ronald Reagan UCLA in Los Angeles
is currently leading a national,
multicenter phase 2 clinical study of an
experimental organ-preservation
system that allows donor hearts to
continue functioning in a near-
physiologic state outside the body
during transport.

The Organ Care System (OCS),
developed by medical device company
TransMedics, works this way:

After a heart is removed from a
donor's body, it is placed in a high-
tech OCS box and is immediately
revived to a beating state, perfused
with oxygen and nutrient-rich blood,
and maintained at an appropriate
temperature. The device also features
monitors that display how the heart is
functioning during transport.

The current standard of transporting
donor hearts in iceboxes in a non-
functioning state, which has been used
for decades, requires the restarting of
the heart once it has been placed
inside the recipient.

The concept of transplanting a donor
heart in a beating state is revolutionary.

This promising technology may
improve the function of the donor
heart, because it remains in a near-
physiologic state. It can also help the
doctors to better assess the suitability
of a potential donor, since they can
test the heart in the device.
Additionally, because the current
transport method requires a donor
heart to be delivered to a recipient
within six hours to remain viable, the
OCS box could potentially help expand
the time available for delivery.

LIFEPORT KIDNEY TRANSPORTER
When a human kidney becomes
available for transplantation it needs to
be preserved and often transplanted
from the donor to recipient in hospitals
that can be many miles away.

Traditionally kidneys are packed in ice
in a cool box, known as static storage.

LifePort provides a sealed, sterile,
protected environment where a
solution is gently pumped through the
kidney at cold temperatures to
minimize damage while the organ is
outside.

The LifePort is lightweight and portable
allowing organs to be perfused from
the time of recovery until the
transplant. It can travel
unaccompanied by land or air, safely
transporting the kidneys across town
or between countries.

While the kidney is being perfused, the
LifePort records data on temperature,
flow rate, vascular resistance and
pressure every 10 seconds, providing
surgeons with additional data prior to
transplantation.

Organ Recovery Systems, the maker,
is based in Chicago, with European
operations headquartered in Brussels.
Organ Recovery Systems currently
supports over 100 leading transplant
programs worldwide with its LifePort
family of products.

Kidney preservation with LifePort
offers potential for more donor kidneys
to be suitable for transplantation,
reducing the current waiting list and
the ongoing cost of care for people
waiting for a kidney transplant.

-------------------------------